Tools I used

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Tools I used most often.

This is Dexter-Russell Chinese Chef Knife, unlike a western clever, this is not meant to chop thick bones although thin chicken bones are acceptable.  This is a replacement for your normal chef’s knife, it sit between the Chinese slicer and theChinese clever.  This knife is big and heavy so it will take some time to get use to.  One thing I like about using this knife is that it cuts everything with ease regardless of size, for example, garlic, watermelon, carrots etc.

Furthermore, I use this to scoop up the chopped-up vegetables easily without buying additional tools.  The blade is thin and sharp; it measure 8 inch in length, 3.25 in width and the spine is 3/32 inch thick.  This knife is made by Dexter-Russell, the largest and oldest American cutlery manufacturer.  I use this knife quite often, I would about say about 50% of the time I will use this knife; then again, it depend on what I am using it for.  The draw back to this knife is that it will dull quite easily because of the type of steels (stainless steel vs carbon steel and % of hard steel to % of soft steel) it uses and how it is made (machine made vs handmade).

As I use this everyday for almost everything, the angle of my blade is about 12-15 degree rather than 20 degree.  At 12-15 degree, the knife is sharp and will hold its edge longer but it is prone to chipping and cracking.  As I mention before, the drawback to this knife is that it dull quickly compare to my Tojiro DP Gyutou – 9.4″ (24cm).  I have to sharpen the Dexter-Russell Chinese Chef Knife at least once a month compare to Tojiro once every four to six months or so but then again I do heavy chopping with the Dexter-Russell.

 

 

This Tojiro DP Gyutou – 9.4″ (24cm) is my second most used knife, 45% of the time I will use this knife because it is razor sharp and it hold its edge longer than my Chinese Chef Knife.  I use this knife when I am cutting beef, sushi/maki, salmon, tomatoes etc.  Tojiro is a brand that most people probably have never heard of; Tojiro isn’t widely known compare to Global, Shun and other Japanese Knife Manufactures but just because it is not widely known that doesn’t mean that it lacks quality.


Tojiro knives are high quality yet inexpensive compare to other companies I have mention above.  It is made in Japan, from a stain-resistant steel with a Hardness Rockwell C scale: 60 ±1   This means that it is constructed with a core of VG-10 stainless steel sandwiched between a layer of softer stainless for ease of sharpening. This knife is very light, it weight 6 oz, the blade length is 240 mm with overall length of 385 mm and its spine thickness is 2.2 mm.  Unlike western knives, which tend to be thicker and heavier, Japanese knives are thinner and lighter require very little effort to cut vegetables and meat with.  The drawback with Japanese knives is that are made with harder steel so it will take a “sharper” (more acute) edge & hold it as long as a less-acute edge on less-hard steel. However, harder steel may chip more easily, & may be more difficult to sharpen to it’s full potential.  All in all, Tojiro knives are great for beginners who might consider buying Japanese knives as it provide great value without sacrificing quality.

 

This Mandarin Strainer is ideal for people who uses a wide wok or large kettle cooker to scoop foods out fast.  This is a sturdy strainer, solidly built and easy to clean; the only down side is that it lacks a hole in the handle.  The strainer is constructed from a single piece of stainless steel, the perforated design is perfect for separating ingredients from hot liquids.  The strong angle handle allows the user’s hand to safely stay away from the stream or hot liquid.  Diameter: 11, Handle: 5, Overall length: 15, 5, Length: 15, 9 in, Width: 11, 5 in, Height: 3, 25 in

 There are also various sizes ranging from 11 inch to 15 inch.

26 Comments

  1. I came across your video demonstration for General Tso’s Chicken and thought it was excellent. I have one question for you though. In your videos you use a wok and an open-flame burner to do your frying. While that might be standard in some countries or in restaurants, that isn’t something many folks have available to them.

    For those of us who are using more standard stoves (gas, electric or range) can you recommend how we might use our stoves to produce your results in frying?

    I am doing a post about your demo video to talk about how detailed it is, in terms of reproducing your results. The one problem I see is reproducing your frying results on a stove that doesn’t have an open burner. I would like to know, for my own benefit, but also for those who would like to get results similar to your recipe.

    Thanks!

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    • Thank You.

      You will get the same results like mine using the standard stoves only if your temperature is constantly around 350F. I use a wok to fry because of the wider surface area the flame will touches the wok compare to a pot (only the bottom portion touches the flame) which means my oil will heat up faster in a wok than a standard pot. This allows me to put in more chicken per batch without having to worry about the temp. In a standard stoves, you have to separate your chicken into several batches when frying because as you put in more chicken the temperature will decreases thus your results will vary. Fry all the chicken at about 50%-60% set it aside then add all the chicken back into the 350F oil and fry until it’s done. The bottom line is you have to maintain a constant temperature of around 350F which you can easily be done on a standard stove. I hope this help you.

      Thanks.

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      • This issue comes up not just for frying. Restaurant wok burners are so much more powerful than even the best home stoves, when you say “medium-low” you’re still using more heat than a home stove can produce on high! (Stupid lousy puny home stoves!! :( )

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      • Hello. I am in love with U. Thank U SO MUCH FOR HELPING ME COOK ASIAN FOOD!!!. I just discovered your you tube videos. Yesterday I made the best chicken on a stick a yellow fried rice. You made it so easy to understand!!! I hope you make a lot of money! I have been wanting to learn how to cook Asian Food for years. I just love it so much. You never get tired of eating it. Every time I go to a Asian restaurant and tell them I want to learn how to cook Asian food it’s like they don’t take me serious, but I am. I want to take some courses. Your videos are great in teaching this. I live in Alabama. How can I get cooking classes. Also, On the tools you list, I didn’t find a listing for a wok. While you advise me of your recommendation. And I may have over looked it but do you have a Hot and Sour Soup Soup Recipe. That’s my most favorite of all! Plus Shrimp Cabbage. Will or do you have a you tube video for these? KEEP DOING WHAT YOU. AWESOME!!!

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    • I purchased a Electric Wok that comes damn close. I did not want the non-stick variety, something big, and something that could crank up to 400 F. This fits the bill. It also has the side benefit of being a great deep fryer, and as a replacement to a electric fry pan. There are some propane models I’ve tried, but are only suitable for the outdoors. Plus the price is right. Presto 5900 1500-Watt Stainless-Steel Electric Wok

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  2. You have the best videos I have ever seen. So much more precision and so much less ego than Western chefs.

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  3. I would love it, if you added which woks you use.

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  4. Raymond, I applaud you for taking the time to produced the best concise video. You should be in the FoodNetwork show for Asian cooking which they lack the line-up.
    Two questions:
    1. Requesting a Salt n Pepper Pork Chops video
    2. Where did you learn how to cook or who trained you?

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    • Okay, request received.

      I learned how to cook from my parents, grandfather and my cousin. I basically grew up in a restaurant. I also learned from other famous food celebrity as well. I grew up watching Food Network shows, my favorite show is Iron Chef because I find interesting and unique ideas from them. I also read a lot of recipe books and get some ideas from them. Lastly, I traveled to other countries and interact with locals and learned from them as well. Still learning though. (^-^).

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  5. Thank you for the best videos! All your recipes are the BEST! What kind of wok do you use?

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  6. If I were to go shopping for all of the things I would need to make your dishes, is there a list you’ve compiled of all of the ingredients I would need to buy?

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  7. HEY!!!!!!! What happened to your authentic restaurant style fried rice recipe???!! I bought a wok, the utensils, and all of the ingredients & the page is deleted! I even asked in a comment section what the difference in taste was between the soy sauces & if oyster sauce gave it that missing restaurant taste. Those questions were deleted and never answered. May I please have that recipe & the sweet and sour chicken recipe you took down? That’s why I subscribed to your site. Now I am terribly disappointed. Could you at least email those two recipes along with how to make the sweet and sour sauce? Thanks.

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    • I found the sweet and sour chicken recipe link. The restaurant recipe version of fried rice you left for a follower in a comment section is gone. I would still love to have that recipe. Thanks.

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  8. I have tried your beef & broccoli and your lo mein recipes which turned out great, even though I did not use a wok to cook with. My wife & I enjoy Chinese cuisine very much, but find it hard find what we feel is fresh quality Chinese food in Baton Rouge, LA. So I’m wondering if you have any recipes for Egg Foo Yong that won’t be overly oily when plated, and perhaps a recipe utilizing fresh green beans. I enjoy your videos on U-tube very much.

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  9. I was in awe as you chopped all your veggies. I watched the Mai Fun, Hot and Sour Soup videos on youtube. Was excited to learn about your site! Know my income tax is going to be buying me a new wok! 😉 What kind do you recommend? Cooking for a family of 5. Wish I had your kitchen!!! 😉

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  10. Raymond your recipes and videos are very good. Please expand on your recipes to include Kung Pau, cashew chicken and others. Sorry for the spells, it’s early.

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  11. Raymond we need new videos from you!!

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  12. hi raymond your recipes are the best they all taste great and videos are easy to follow ,i tell my friends if they want the best chinese recipes to watch your videos .
    regards lindsey

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  13. you are good, I do like your videos.

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  14. You are just simply amazing!!!

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  15. Hello Raymond,
    I am a Chinese from Singapore and have a passion for cooking.
    I chanced upon your blog a week ago and must admit your Chinese cooking is really authentic and professional, I like your precise method of preparation and enjoy watching your videos. Keep up the good work of sharing your recipes.
    The way you handle the wok, you must either be a chef or an owner chef running a restaurant.

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